April UpZete

This month’s issue features a convention preview, a feature piece by the In Flanders Fields Fund, and a recap of this year’s LTI events.


Volunteers needed for new Implementation Teams

As we approach the end of the traditional academic year, Zeta Psi gets to work planning for the future. Last summer, Zeta Psi created seven implementation teams and those efforts resulted in a new Risk Management Policy, a framework for alcohol usage on Zeta Psi premises, a new insurance modifier system, a Sexual Misconduct Prevention Pledge, updated disciplinary procedures, a refreshed Honor Campaign, and numerous revisions to our Constitution and By-Laws.

This year, we are opening up three new I-teams and asking for volunteers to help chart our path forward.

  1. Social Events Guide – the team will review best practices around social events and for the first time publish a detailed guide that demonstrates how Zeta Psi can safely and effectively host social events.
  2. Social Media Policy — Zeta Psi has not had a social media policy for its chapters or Zeta Psi controlled spaces. The team will study the issue, complete an environmental scan, and craft appropriate policies for the use and oversight of these increasingly important and rapidly changing spaces.
  3. ZeteForward calls for the elimination of the term “pledge.” Last summer, we started the process and selected temporary nomenclature of “candidate”, but we hope to complete the process and select a final revised name with this I-team.

All three I-teams will be asked to work in the months of June and July to create their recommendations. In early August, we will conduct Electronic Town Halls via video conference for all of the official convention delegates to hear the recommendations and provide feedback. The teams will then update the report and make final recommendations at the Louisville convention. If all goes well, we will have operating policies and guides for Social Events and Social Media and a decision about what we will call our new members for the start of the Fall 2017 semester.

If you want to volunteer for an Implementation Team, please send an e-mail to exec.dir@zetapsi.org and let me know on which team you want to work. If you have questions, please e-mail.

Faithfully yours in TKPhi,
Lauck


Convention 2017 – Louisville, KY

The Distinguished Service Award the highest honor you can receive in Zeta Psi. It is awarded during the Grand Chapter Banquet at the annual convention to a Brother who has earned it through a lifetime of service and dedication to Zeta Psi.

This year, the recipient will be none other than M. David Hunter.

Dave was a founding member of the Iota Alpha Chapter, Active Chapter Phi, Elder Phi of 2 chapters, he spent 13 years on the Board of Trustees culminating in becoming Phi Alpha of the Fraternity and President of the Foundation. Dave also served a ten year term as Executive Director of Zeta Psi Fraternity and Zeta Psi Educational Foundation.

Registration for Convention is live. Be sure to register to see Dave receive this well-deserved honor on Saturday night of Convention!

Reflections on the Poppy and Remembrance
By Michael Brunelle (Delta Chi, 2017)

To the Zeta Psi Fraternity and the Western world, the poppy flower is a symbol of remembrance for soldiers fallen in war. But what are the origins of the poppy as a symbol? It starts with the uses of the poppy. Since antiquity, the extracts of the poppy have been used in medical treatments, most commonly treatments of battlefield wounds and ailments. The calm that would come over wounded and dying soldiers established poppies’ relationship with peacefulness and eternal slumber. The deep red color of the poppy became associated with blood, more specifically the blood being shed for one’s country, and therefore the honor that came with fighting. During World War One, we saw our brother, Lt. Col. John McCrae, pen the seminal poem In Flanders Fields, drawing upon and further developing the symbolism of the poppy. He focused on its meaning as a symbol of remembrance because poppies grew where his fallen friends lie. His poignant words spoke to the world, and are still recited every year in remembrance.

Today, the poppy is held in the highest regard as a symbol of remembrance. In the United States, the poppy is an ever-present symbol at Veterans Day and Memorial Day celebrations, reminding Americans of what sacrifice truly means. In the Commonwealth Nations of Canada and the United Kingdom, the poppy is a focal point of Memorial Day ceremonies. In Canada, the poem is recited across the nation, as members of Parliament and the public gather to pay tribute to their countrymen. The same is done in the United Kingdom, with all citizens, public officials, and members of the armed forces present for moments of silence and observance. On the centenary of the start of the First World War, the UK government flooded the moat of the tower of London with over 800,000 ceramic poppies, creating the “Bloodswept Lands and Seas of Red” referenced in a poem by an unknown British soldier who died in Flanders. These annual events promise to hold brave soldiers’ sacrifice in our memories forever, but we can never offer enough thanks.

Remembrance is a primary way in which we can repay those who lost their lives to keep us safe, and as years go by, it becomes harder to maintain our promise. The 1918 Armistice’s Centennial will soon be upon us, and how many of us can say we truly remember our veterans’ sacrifices? How many of us have spoken to veterans and held on to their memories to be passed on to others? We have been handed a great responsibility, one that becomes greater as time passes. And much like our commitment to the tenets of our fraternity, and the love we have for our brothers, this remembrance must remain in the forefront of our minds.

In the same manner as our nations, the In Flanders Fields Fund wishes to carry on the memory of our heroes as well. We will host our Third Annual Commemoration, in honor of Brother McCrae and the many brave souls who fight for our nations, on April 30th, 2017 at noon. The event will be held at Pershing Park in the heart of Washington, DC. For more details, contact Brother Tom Florczak, Executive Director of the In Flanders Fields Fund, at tflorczak@inflandersfields.org

Spring LTI Recap!

The Zeta Psi LTI program has completed another year of successful Regional LTIs. This year, Zeta Psi held eight Regional LTIs across three countries and two continents. Averaging nearly 70 brothers per LTI, this year’s slate of Regional LTIs combined our familiar standard LTI courses with special sessions curated specifically for each region. The LTI program also partnered with local response and advocacy organizations to deliver sexual violence prevention training to members at every Regional LTI. These partnerships proved indisputably valuable, and the program hopes to leverage partnerships with local organizations moving forward.

Looking ahead, the LTI program is planning a major facelift for the 2017-18 slate or Regional LTIs. The program will be seeking a significant increase in local volunteer efforts at Regional LTIs, specifics of which will be released in the coming weeks. We hope to use future Regional LTIs as a way to bring all local brothers, both active and elder, together for weekends targeting risk training, professional development, and local networking. Regardless of your standing within Zeta Psi, we hope to welcome you to a Regional LTI in 2017-18.

A huge “thank you” to all LTI faculty members and attendees for another great year of Regional LTIs.

LTI Luncheon at the Parc10 Hotel in Montreal, PQ, March 25, 2017

Upcoming Events

DC Elders Banquet – April 29, 2017 (Washington, D.C.)
Founders Day Banquet – June 3, 2017 (New York, NY)
Zeta Psi’s 170th Convention – August 1620, 2017 (Louisville, KY)

All Zetes have a duty to report issues related to the health and safety of our members and guests. It is usually best to report issues to an active or elder Chapter officer, but when that’s not your preference, you may report any concern through our Ethics Point system. You may identify yourself or remain anonymous as you choose. To make a report, please visit:

Ethics Point Hotline